The Center for the Developing Adolescent in the News

The Science Behind Tweens’ Risky Behavior—and Why It Can Help Them in The Long Run

Center Leadership Team member Adriana Galván, UCLA, talked to the Washington Post about the importance of healthy risk taking for adolescents, and why we need to stop creating narratives that pathologize this key developmental window.

Posted on September 18, 2018

Finding Gear for Teens to Try Out Hobbies

The New York Times talked to Ron Dahl and other development experts about the benefits of hobbies for adolescents, and how developmental changes during this period can turn passing interests into passions. Reporter Courtney Schley also offers tips and recommendations to scaffold budding interests. 

Posted on September 14, 2018

More Teens Would Rather Text Their Friends Than Hang Out IRL

The Center’s Chief Science Officer, Ron Dahl, talked to Quartz about Common Sense Media’s 2018 survey on adolescents’ social media use. The survey revealed some troubling new data about social media as a distraction from personal relationships and sleep. But overall, young people report that social media has a positive effect on their emotions.

Posted on September 10, 2018

Statement: Unaccompanied Adolescent Migrants Need Their Families, Too

More than 11,000 unaccompanied migrant minors — mostly adolescents — are being held in government-funded shelters, most for far longer than the Flores rule allows.

Here’s why their health and well-being depend on their swift movement out of detention centers to be with family members here in the U.S.

Posted on August 30, 2018

Importance of Investing in Adolescence from a Developmental Science Perspective

In this Research Perspective for Nature, Ron Dahl, Nick Allen, Linda Wilbrecht, and Ahna Suleiman (members of the Center's Leadership Team) make the case for global investment in the health and well-being of adolescents.

Developmental science, including findings about the ways puberty changes some aspects of learning in early youth, can point to the most effective timing and targets of programs for youth. The authors explain that using science-informed strategies during this sensitive window for learning can support positive outcomes for the more than one billion adolescents in the world today, for the adults that they become, and for the next generation.

Posted on June 6, 2018